longevity risk

Single Women and Longevity Risk Part 3: Planning for Expenses in Retirement

Planning for Expenses in Retirement

In Part 2 of this three-part blog series on single women and longevity risk, we discussed the importance of investing to supplement your income in retirement and minimize the risk of outliving your financial resources. In Part 3, we’ll explore why planning for expenses in retirement—both expected and unexpected—is essential when it comes to managing longevity risk.  

Estimating Your Expenses in Retirement

Failing to consider and plan for the various costs you’re likely to incur in retirement can lead to a savings shortfall, increasing the risk that you’ll outlive your assets. Thus, creating a retirement budget is necessary to ensure you’re saving enough and investing appropriately.

Of course, there are always uncertainties when it comes to planning for the future. Nevertheless, with the right guidance, it’s possible to project your retirement expenses with a reasonable degree of accuracy.

For example, basic living expenses like food, housing, utilities, and clothing tend to remain relatively steady in retirement and are therefore easier to anticipate. Yet other items like healthcare, travel, and entertainment often rise significantly once you stop working.

In fact, a recent report by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College found that in 2018, 12% of the median retiree’s total retirement income went toward medical expenses. Moreover, since 2000, the price of medical care has increased at a faster rate than the overall inflation rate.

Meanwhile, with more free time on your hands, you may wish to travel more and take longer, more expensive trips in retirement. Plus, you’re more likely to spend money on other types of entertainment once work no longer demands so much of your time.

No matter your retirement plans, it’s important to consider how your lifestyle goals will impact your budget and plan accordingly. This can help you determine what size nest egg you’ll need to retire successfully and mitigate longevity risk.  

Planning for Unexpected Expenses in Retirement

In addition to the expenses we can reasonably project, others can crop up as we age and our homes, children, and spouses age along with us. Unfortunately, unexpected expenses can mess with the best-laid plans when you’re living off savings and fixed sources of income like Social Security.

Therefore, it’s best to expect the unexpected and prepare for these expenses as best you can. Here’s a list of unexpected expenses you may face in retirement:

Home Repairs & Maintenance Costs

Many Americans own their homes when they reach retirement age. (When I say “own,” I mean they own their homes outright or are still paying down their mortgage as opposed to renting.)

It’s easy to overlook or postpone home maintenance, especially if everything looks fine on the surface. But homes age just like we do, and putting off necessary repairs can become a significant financial expense down the road.

A recent personal experience drove this point home when a routine paint job turned into a major dry rot mitigation project costing tens of thousands of dollars!

When it comes to planning for unexpected expenses in retirement, here’s a best practice to prevent a surprise cost like mine: hire a professional to inspect your home for hidden problems such as dry rot, termites, mold, foundation issues, leaks, and outdated plumbing and electrical systems. Then, develop a multi-year plan to fix the problems and schedule ongoing routine maintenance.

Remodeling Expenses

In addition to the unglamorous fixes a home occasionally needs, it’s not unusual to grow tired of your home decor over time. You may decide to buy new furniture or appliances or update the exterior of your home in retirement, all of which can be costly.

In some cases, you may simply want your home to maintain its value if you plan to eventually sell it. For example, kitchen and bathroom styles tend to change every 10-20 years, prompting homeowners to make major updates.

Or you may need to alter your home so you can age in place comfortably and safely. While no one likes to think about the possibility of losing mobility, it’s one of the realities many of us must face as our bodies age.

Regardless of the impetuous, remodeling costs are common in retirement and can be substantial. Thus, it’s best to expect them and manage your finances accordingly.  

Unexpected HealthCare Costs

The first time many retirees realize Medicare isn’t as cheap as they thought it would be is when they receive a notice from the Social Security Administration about IRMAA. IRMAA, which stands for Income-Related Monthly Adjustment Amount, is an extra charge added to your Medicare Part B and Part D premiums if your income exceeds a certain threshold.

When on Medicare, you pay monthly premiums for Part B, which covers doctor services, outpatient care, and preventive services, and Part D, which covers prescription drugs. But if you’re a high-income earner according to your tax return from two years ago, the government says, “Hey, you can afford to contribute a little more.”

So, they add an extra charge (IRMAA) to your monthly premiums. And the more you earn, the higher your IRMAA charge will be.

Also, Medicare doesn’t cover all healthcare-related expenses in retirement. You’ll still be responsible for co-pays, deductibles, and coinsurance, as well as long-term care, dental, hearing, and eye care. These out-of-pocket costs can add up quickly if you have a significant health issue or need extensive care.

Again, proper planning is essential to mitigate these costs. To avoid IRMAA, you can work with a financial planner to develop a retirement income plan that keeps your taxable income below the threshold.

In addition, you may want to consider buying a Medigap or Medicare Advantage policy to defray the healthcare costs Medicare doesn’t cover.

Medigap policies fill in the gaps in original Medicare coverage, including medical care when traveling outside the U.S. Just keep in mind you’ll still need a separate prescription drug plan (Medicare Part D).

Alternatively, Medicare Advantage (Part C) offers an “all-in-one” alternative to original Medicare. However, these plans are generally in HMOs or PPOs, which may limit your access to certain healthcare professionals or facilities.

Long-Term Care

Another common misconception is that Medicare covers long-term care costs. It doesn’t. This can be problematic, since most older adults will likely need long-term care during their lifetimes.

In fact, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that 70% of those turning 65 this year will eventually need long-term care. Meanwhile, women are more likely to need long-term care than men and for a longer duration, according to data from Morningstar.

These services can be costly—typically thousands of dollars a month in expenses. Unfortunately, long-term care insurance is also expensive, and the rigorous eligibility requirements put it out of reach for many.

If you qualify for long-term care insurance and can afford it, you may want to consider your available options, including hybrid policies that include a life insurance component. Otherwise, self-funding long-term care by saving and investing enough money during your working years is likely your best option.

Family Obligations

It’s not uncommon for adult children or other relatives to need financial help occasionally. These requests can be tough to negotiate, especially if your loved ones don’t understand the strain an unexpected loan or gift can have on your finances in retirement.

Although discussing money is taboo in many families, it’s wise to be transparent about your financial circumstances and create boundaries around financial requests. If this isn’t a viable option, be sure to include potential loans and gifts when planning for expenses in retirement.

Losing a Spouse

Morningstar estimates that 90% of women will manage assets on their own at some point during their lifetimes. Many women experience this for the first time in retirement due to the death of a spouse.

Losing a spouse can be emotionally devastating, no matter your stage of life. Yet failing to prepare financially for this possibility can make an already challenging situation even worse.

If you depend on your partner financially, there are steps you can take now to safeguard your financial independence if you unexpectedly lose them. For example:

  • Consider purchasing a life insurance policy to replace lost income or cover funeral costs and other outstanding expenses.
  • If your spouse has a pension, explore your survivorship options before retirement to ensure continued payments.
  • Understand Social Security survivors benefits, especially if your spouse has the higher earnings record.
  • Consult an estate-planning attorney to ensure your estate plan is current and organized for a seamless transition of assets.

With Proper Planning, Single Women Can Minimize Longevity Risk and Thrive Financially in Retirement

Planning for expected and unexpected expenses in retirement is crucial for maintaining financial stability and peace of mind. Yet minimizing longevity risk requires more than managing your expenses. Meeting your savings targets and investing for your long-term goals is also essential.

Remember, the earlier you start preparing financially for retirement, the better off you’ll be long-term. Moreover, you don’t have to go it alone. A fiduciary financial planner like Curtis Financial Planning can provide expert guidance and help you implement the right strategies to secure your financial future. To learn more, please explore our services and free financial planning resources.

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Single Women and Longevity Risk Part 2: The Importance of Investing

Single Women and Investing

Saving and investing are both crucial for financial health. Yet investing is particularly important when it comes to mitigating longevity risk.  In Part 2 of this three-part series about single women and longevity risk, we’ll delve into the significance of investing and explore how understanding risk and reward can empower women to become better investors.

Differentiating Saving and Investing

When it comes to personal finance, many conflate saving and investing. While both are crucial for financial stability, they serve different purposes.

Saving entails setting aside a portion of your income for near-term expenses or potential emergencies. In other words, your savings should be a safety net that’s liquid and risk-free.

Investing, however, implies allocating money to stocks, bonds, and other assets in anticipation of a potential return in the future. Despite the inherent risks, investing is an essential strategy for single women to increase wealth over time, so you don’t outlive your financial resources.  

Understanding the Risk-Reward Relationship

While investing offers the potential for a higher return on your money, it’s also inherently riskier than saving. That’s why many women hold too much cash relative to their financial goals.

If you tend to be risk averse, you’re not alone. In fact, one Northwestern Mutual study found that in general, U.S. adults prefer to play it safe with their money than take risks.

However, understanding the risk-reward relationship is crucial for overcoming the confidence gap that many women experience as investors. Each investment carries a different level of risk, and effectively managing these risks is essential to achieve your financial goals.

Typically, investments with the potential for higher returns carry a higher degree of risk (although high risk doesn’t guarantee high returns). For example, higher-risk investments like individual stocks and equity funds generally offer the potential for higher returns over time. Conversely, lower-risk assets like savings accounts and short-term Treasury bonds tend to yield more modest returns.

Navigating the Risk vs. Reward Dilemma

Many women face the dilemma of whether to keep their money safe in a bank account or invest it for potential growth. Indeed, research suggests that men are generally more willing to take risks with their finances than women.

However, studies also indicate that as women gain confidence through education and experience, they become better investors. Moreover, women investors are more likely to exhibit traits such as reduced trading, increased patience, openness to advice, more diversified portfolios, and a healthy skepticism towards “hot” investments.

Ultimately, your financial goals determine the level of returns you need from your investments. Saving for a house down payment in the next few years, for example, might require safer investments with less risk. In contrast, saving for retirement that’s several decades away allows for higher-risk investments with the potential for more significant returns.

But you also need to weigh your return objectives against your comfort level with taking on risk. In this case, risk generally refers to the possibility of losing your money. Taking on more risk than you can tolerate can lead you to make rash investment decisions that impede your progress toward your financial goals.

Single Women and Investing: Mitigating Longevity Risk

To mitigate the risk of running out of money prematurely, women must embrace some investment risk. By profiling four different investors, we can illustrate the outcomes along the risk spectrum.

Assume the following savers/investors invest $50,000 for ten years and reinvest all interest and dividends.

  • Investor #1 places her $50,000 in a savings account earning an average annual return of 1.5%. Her account grows to $57.815 in 10 years.
  • Investor #2 places her $50,000 into a certificate of deposit (CD) with an annual yield of 3%. Her account grows to $67,196 in 10 years.
  • Investor #3 places her $50,000 into a diversified portfolio* of 60% stocks and 40% bonds earning a 6% average annualized return. As a result, her account grows to $89,542 in 10 years.
  • Investor #4 places her $50,000 into a diversified portfolio* of 100% stocks, and it earns a 9% average annualized return. As a result, her account grows to $129,687 in 10 years.

A Note on Volatility

While the 100% stock portfolio generates the highest outcome, it also experiences substantial fluctuations over the 10-year period. Meanwhile, the 60% stock/40% bond portfolio exhibits less volatility due to the lower risk associated with bonds. 

Consider the following hypothetical annual return patterns for these two portfolios:

The graphs above illustrate how Investor #4 experiences larger swings in performance over the 10-year period by investing exclusively in stocks than Investor #3. In other words, the price of higher returns is generally increased volatility.

Thus, investors who are unable to weather the ups and downs of the stock market may need to sacrifice return potential to stay the course over time.  

*Diversified portfolio returns were generated using Vanguard Total Market Funds, both U.S. and international.

Striking the Right Balance to Reach Your Financial Goals

The challenge for many independent women investors is understanding their risk tolerance in relation to their need for return.

For example, if Investor #1 doesn’t invest in stocks, will she reach her financial goals and manage longevity risk, or will she run out of money before the end of her life? On the other hand, does Investor #4 need to take quite so much risk, or can she beat longevity risk by investing in a less volatile portfolio?

These are the answers I seek when working with my female clients. Ultimately, my aim is to keep my clients invested for the long term to experience the magic of compounding returns and reach their financial goals.

In the third and final article in this blog series, we’ll look at the other side of the equation: minimizing longevity risk by managing your expenses in retirement.

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Single Women and Longevity Risk Part 1: Why Independent Women Are Most at Risk

Single Women and Longevity Risk Part 1

This is the first blog post in a three-part series about single women and longevity risk. In this article, we’ll explore why independent women are most at risk of outliving their financial resources.

One of the reasons long-term financial planning is important is to minimize longevity risk, or the risk of outliving your financial resources. Longevity risk is generally brought up in connection with retirement, since the risk of depleting your savings increases once you stop working.

With advances in healthcare and increasing life expectancies, longevity risk is becoming an increasingly relevant concern for many retirees. Unfortunately, single women are among those most at risk of outliving their resources due to a variety of factors.

#1: Women Live Longer Than Men

First, women tend to live longer than men on average, which means they may need to support themselves financially for a longer period during retirement. According to a 2021 CDC study, the average life expectancy for women in the United States is 79.1, while for men, it’s 73.2.

However, using an average statistic to determine life expectancy and longevity risk can be problematic as each person’s family, health history, and lifestyle differ. Fortunately, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has a life expectancy calculator that can help you better understand your likelihood of living past a certain age.

For example, a 45-year-old woman’s life expectancy today is 85.4 years. But if she lives until age 70, her life expectancy increases to 88.9.

#2: Single Women Face Unique Financial Challenges

Second, single women often face unique financial challenges, such as lower average incomes. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, women working full-time and year-round make 83.7% of what men earn in similar jobs.

In addition, women are more likely than men to experience a gap in employment due to caregiving responsibilities, which can interrupt their earning and saving potential. The Covid-19 pandemic exacerbated this disparity, as women’s participation in the workforce tumbled disproportionately in part due to increased childcare responsibilities as schools and daycares closed.

Given these challenges, women tend to save less than men on average, further contributing to longevity risk. In fact, a recent T. Rowe Price report found that women tend to contribute less annually to workplace retirement accounts than men and have meaningfully lower account balances.

#3: Women Tend to Invest Less Often and More Conservatively Than Men

According to data from Morningstar, women tend to invest less and hold a larger percentage of cash than their male counterparts.

Studies show that this is largely due to a lack of confidence. For example, Fidelity’s 2021 Women and Investing Study revealed that only 19% of women feel confident in their ability to choose investments that align with their financial goals.

Unfortunately, this lack of confidence often translates to smaller nest eggs in retirement, increasing longevity risk. Consider the following example.

Suppose you invested $1,000 in the U.S. stock market 30 years ago, at the beginning of 1993. Over the next 30 years, the S&P 500 generated an annualized return of 9.7% before accounting for inflation.

That means at the end of 2022, you would have had $16,074 if you reinvested all dividends. Had you kept this money in a savings account that yielded an average of 1% over the last 30 years, you’d have about $1,347 at the end of the same period.

Thus, investing is necessary for single women to minimize longevity risk and outpace inflation, so your dollars don’t lose value in retirement.

How Single Women Can Address Longevity Risk

To address longevity risk, engaging in proactive financial planning is essential. This includes:

  • Saving and investing. It’s crucial to start saving early and regularly contribute to retirement accounts, such as 401(k)s or IRAs, to accumulate a sufficient nest egg for retirement. Within investment accounts, include stocks for their above-average growth potential and diversify your investments to mitigate market volatility risks.
  • Estimating retirement expenses. Assess your expected expenses during retirement, including healthcare costs, housing, and daily living expenses. This evaluation can help determine how much you need to save to ensure a comfortable retirement and reduce longevity risk.
  • Social Security planning. Understand how the Social Security system works and develop a strategy to maximize your benefits. Consider when to start claiming benefits and spousal or survivor benefits if applicable.
  • Long-term care insurance. Evaluate the potential need for long-term care insurance to protect against the high costs associated with extended care services. Research different policies and assess your options based on your health, family history, and financial situation.
  • Health and wellness. Prioritize maintaining good health and adopting a healthy lifestyle. Being healthy can contribute to a longer and more active retirement, reducing potential healthcare expenses and increasing overall financial security.

By being proactive and mindful of longevity risk, single women can take steps to secure their ongoing financial well-being.

Part 2: The Importance of Investing for Single Women to Offset Longevity Risk

Although single women face a variety of unique challenges and risks when it comes to financial planning, there are steps you can take to manage these risks and achieve your financial goals. In Part 2 of this blog series, we’ll dive deeper into why it’s so important for single women to invest when it comes to minimizing longevity risk.

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