How to Take Control of Your Spending This Year, Part 1: Reduce Your Spending by Creating Healthy Habits

Reduce Your Spending by Creating Healthy Habits

This article is the first in a four-part series to help you reduce your spending this year. I’ll be sharing the knowledge and experience I’ve gained over the last 20 years creating financial plans and guiding women to take control of their finances to help you develop healthier spending habits.

I know many people scoff at the idea of New Year’s resolutions. But I don’t. I believe it’s an opportunity to try and jump-start new habits.

Yes, you can start a new behavior in March or September, but something about a new year motivates me—and maybe you, too. Plus, it helps if the habit you’re trying to change causes you distress, so you’re motivated to work on it throughout the year.

For example, many people want to reduce their discretionary spending. They intuitively know that their spending is getting in the way of achieving their financial goals, but they don’t know what to do about it.

In part one of this series, I’m sharing the simple mindset shift that can help you reduce your spending once and for all.

January is an excellent month to begin a new spending plan.

You may have noticed that I’ve been using the word “habit” a lot. But what do habits have to do with spending?

Many of our behaviors become habits. Overspending or unconsciously spending is a habit, which is actually good news if you’re trying to reduce your spending.  

Many experts—for example, James Clear, who wrote the book Atomic Habits—have shared their wisdom and strategies for breaking bad habits and replacing them with new ones.  We’ll be leveraging the wealth of information available on this topic, as well as my own experience as a financial planner, to help you get control of your spending in 2023.

What does it take to develop new habits?

If you want to change your habits and reduce your spending this year, living in denial isn’t the answer. Your brain won’t like that. It will fight back too hard.

Instead, you’ll need to make thoughtful decisions about where to allocate your resources moving forward. Eventually, cutting back on spending will be something you want to do because you know it will get you to a better place.

Ready to reduce your spending? Let’s get started.

Each blog post in this series will focus on getting you to think and then take action. You will be writing, so get a pen and paper out, or boot up your laptop. By week four, you’ll have a new attitude and plan in place to help you reduce your spending and get back on track towards your financial goals.

Are you ready to get started? Great. In the next article, we’ll work on identifying your spending weaknesses.

In the meantime, I invite you to check out these free resources to help you better understand and take control of your personal finances.

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Curtis Financial Planning